Advanced Steel Construction

Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 164-174 (2009)


DESIGN OF WIDE-FLANGE STAINLESS STEEL SECTIONS

M. Lecce 1 and K.J.R. Rasmussen 2

1 Post Doctoral Fellow, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Toronto,

Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 1A4

Tel: +1-416-978-3097, Fax: +1=416-978-6813, E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2 Professor, School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney,

Sydney, New South Wales, NSW 2006, Australia

Tel: +61 2 9351 2125, Fax: +61 2 9351 3343, E-mail:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

DOI:10.18057/IJASC.2009.5.2.6

 

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ABSTRACT

  This paper describes a design procedure proposed to determine the moment capacities for the distortional and local buckling of wide-flange stainless steel sections influenced by flange curling. Experimental tests and theoretical analysis, conducted by the authors, of commercially available wide-flange stainless steel sections in pure bending have shown that flange-curling, where the wide-flange cross-section moves towards the neutral axis, reduces the cross-sectional section modulus, produces nonlinear stress distributions and increases the critical elastic buckling stresses. For the sections investigated, the section modulus is reduced by approximately 6% to 16.9%, while the critical elastic buckling stress is increased by a factor of 1.10 to 3.41. Overall, it was found that flange curling produced a net increase of up to 10.6% for the distortional buckling moment capacity but a net decrease of up to 12.2% for the local buckling moment capacity. Based on this data, it is recommended that the effects of flange curling should be ignored for distortional buckling but that it would be necessary to consider them for local buckling. This paper investigates whether the recently proposed Direct Strength Method (DSM) for the distortional buckling of stainless steel sections developed by Lecce and Rasmussen [1], the Winter curve for local buckling, and the North American Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members [2] DSM formulations for cold-formed carbon steel are applicable to wide-flange stainless steel sections in bending. It is concluded that the recently proposed DSM for stainless steel sections in compression can also be used, as presented herein, for wide-flange stainless steel sections in bending.

 

KEYWORDS

Concrete filled tubular columns, steel fibre reinforced concrete, finite element analysis, composite column, square hollow steel section


REFERENCES

[1]       Lecce, M., and Rasmussen, K.J.R., “Distortional Buckling of Cold-Formed Stainless Steel Sections: Finite Element Modeling and Design”, Journal of Structural Engineering, 2006, Vol. 134, No. 4, pp. 505-514.

[2]       AISI, “North American Specification for the Design of Cold-Formed Steel Structural Members”, 2007, American Iron and Steel Institute, Washington, D.C.

[3]       Lecce, M., and Rasmussen, K.J.R., “Experimental Investigation of Wide Flange Stainless Steel Sections in Bending”, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Steel and Aluminium Structures, Ed. R.G. Beale, Oxford, July 2007, pp. 1033-1040.

[4]       Lecce, M., and Rasmussen, K.J.R., “Nonlinear Flange Curling of Wide-Flange Sections”, Research Report No. 850, 2005, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney.

[5]       Lecce, M., and Rasmussen, K.J.R., “Nonlinear Flange Curling in Wide Flange Sections”, Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 2008, Vol. 64, No. 7-8, pp. 779-784.

[6]       Winter, G., “Stress Distribution in and Equivalent Width of Flanges of Wide, Thin-Walled Steel Beams”, NACA Technical Note, 1940 (784).

[7]       Bernard, E.S., Bridge, R.Q., and Hancock, G.J., “Flange Curling in Profiled Steel Decks”, Thin-Walled Structures, 1996, Vol. 25, No. 1, pp. 1-29.

[8]       Bernard, E.S., Bridge, R.Q., and Hancock, G.J., “Design Methods for Profiled Steel Decks with Intermediate Stiffeners” Journal of Constructional Steel Research, 1996, Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 61-88.

[9]       Davies, J.M., and Chiu, R., “Flange Curling in Slender Sections” Proceedings of the 4th Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures, Ed. J. Loughlan, 2004. Loughborough, UK, IOP Publishing Ltd., pp. 39-55.

[10]    AS/NZS 4673, “Cold-Formed Stainless Steel Structures”, Australian Standard/New Zealand Standard 4673:2001, 2001, Standards Australia, Sydney, Australia.

[11]     Lecce, M., and Rasmussen, K.J.R., “Experimental Investigation of Stainless Steel Roof Sections in Pure Bending”, Research Report No.847, 2005, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney.

[12]     Papangelis, J.P., and Hancock, G.J., “Computer Analysis of Thin-Walled Structural Members. Computers & Structures”, 1995, Vol. 56, No. 1, pp. 157-176.

[13]     Rasmussen, K.J.R., Burns, T., and Bezkorovainy, P., “Design of Stiffened Elements in Cold-Formed Stainless Steel Sections”, Journal of Structural Engineering, 2004, Vol. 130, No. 11, pp. 1764-1771.