Advanced Steel Construction

Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 303-324 (2009)


SUITABILITY OF TAPERED FLANGE I-SECTIONS IN SEISMIC MOMENT RESISTING FRAMES

R. Goswami 1 and C.V.R. Murty 2,*

1 Ph.D. Scholar, Department of Civil Engineering,

Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, India

2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering,

Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, India

* (Corresponding author: E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Received: 18 December 2007; Revised: 16 February 2008; Accepted: 4 March 2008

 

DOI:10.18057/IJASC.2009.5.3.6

 

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ABSTRACT

  Tapered flange sections offer difficulties of providing connections that are expected to resist overstrength plastic moments of members and associated shear. However, some earthquake prone countries still are using tapered flange sections for constructing buildings to resist severe seismic shaking. Tapered flange sections available in India not only offer low sections properties (moment of inertia I, flange width b), but also do not meet the internationally accepted stability requirements. This paper highlights deficiencies in tapered flange sections and reiterates some important issues in earthquake-resistant connection design.

 

KEYWORDS

Tapered flange sections; seismic design; moment frames; stability; compact section; connection design; plastic; overstrength


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